Monday, December 12, 2016

The Plan


SPECS:

HULL TYPE: SCOW
LOA: 37 FT • LOD: 36 FT • LWL: 35 FT • BEAM: 16 FT
STEERING: TWIN KICK-UP BOARDS & RUDDERS
RIG TYPE: CHINESE JUNK • SAIL AREA: 1000 SQ FT
DRAFT: BOARDS DOWN 7 FT, BOARDS UP 1.5 FT
DISPLACEMENT: 12 TONS • GROSS TONNAGE: 25 TONS
BALLAST: 7 TONS; WATER 5 TONS, STEEL SCRAP 3 TONS
CONSTRUCTION: FIBERGLASS OVER MARINE PLYWOOD
BUILD TYPE: MANUFACTURED KIT, RAPID DIY ASSEMBLY
ENGINE: 40 HP OUTBOARD IN INBOARD WELL
CRUISING SPEED: 6 KNOTS • MAX SPEED: 7.5 KNOTS
WATER: 1,380 GALLONS • GASOLINE: 50 GALLONS
PROPANE: 2 20-LB CYLINDERS IN VENTED LOCKER
ACCOMMODATIONS: SLEEPS 10 ADULTS, 5 WITH PRIVACY
LAYOUT: 2 AFT CABINS, VESTIBULE, GALLEY, HEAD,
SALON, 2 PILOT BERTHS, “U-BERTH” IN BOW



At this point, QUIDNON's design is sufficiently far along and verified to proceed with plans for a full-size build. The timeline is as follows:

Winter/Spring 2017: Raise funds for the initial full-size build

Spring 2017: Finish full-scale design; generate and refine tool paths for all of the plywood panels; generate mechanical drawings for all other pieces; generate a bill of materials and draw up a detailed budget.

Summer/Fall 2017: Mill out all of the plywood panels; weld and plate steel components

Fall/Winter 2017: Transport plywood to build location and assemble the hull; glass and paint the hull

Winter/Spring 2018: Launch the boat

Spring/Summer 2018: Complete the boat while it is at the dock

Summer/Fall 2018: Sea trials

This is an aggressive schedule, but my growing family needs a bigger boat already, and so time is of the essence. And besides, I'd like to get many more people living aboard and sailing QUIDNONs as soon as I can.

22 comments:

  1. Are you planning on a fundraiser? Or discounted deposits, perhaps? The latter would give you an idea about who is serious about building a Quidnon. I think I could get my wife to let me put $1000 deposit down, in order to get on the short list once the kits are in production.

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    1. Yes, we plan to run a crowdfunding campaign. The biggest challenge is reaching enough people and making them aware of the project ahead of time, since the campaign only runs for a couple of weeks.

      That's not a bad idea. There are various ways of rewarding donors. The one thing I've thought of so far is that the largest donors will receive a limited edition full-color book detailing the design process with sketches and 3D renderings that won't be seen anywhere else. Offering discounts on future kit purchases is an excellent idea!

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    2. Hi Dmitry!

      Sorry about my ignorance, but I'm not yet quite sure what is your plan to replicate the Quidnon.

      Are you gonna sell the kits or only the plan (or both)?
      How you are thinking about it in terms of copyright and patents?

      Thank you very much for your time.

      Ortiz

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    3. Just selling the plans would not be useful. We could potentially license the toolpaths (g-code) for cutting out the panels out of plywood using an NC mill. Copyright is automatic, patents do not apply.

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  2. Where will you be building? Are you looking for volunteer helpers?

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    Replies
    1. I've been slowly researching a build site on the Kentucky River, somewhere between the mouth at the Ohio River and Lock #4. There are a lot of old, industrial sites with concrete shipping docks, but so far it looks like either none would consider an access lease or the actual owners cannot be located. I figure that would be cheaper than leasing waterfront property anywhere along the Eastern Seaboard, and then just float it on down with the flow during Autumn. But so far, that might be a bust idea.

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    2. Not sure yet about the initial build site. And, yes, having some volunteer helpers will definitely... help!

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  3. The first kit is going to be built in Boston. After that kits will be sourced from near the build site, which can be anywhere in the world. First hull will probably be built in coastal South Carolina. After that it... anywhere in the world that's near water.

    The project needs lots of skill sets, including unskilled labor. This is a huge learning opportunity as well as a chance to hone expert skills.

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  4. Reading this now wow sailing south from San Francisco (3G out here!) in my quaint little Bermudan rigged keelboat. My family of four fills it to the brim, but it will do the job for the coming season in the sea of Cortez. Thanks for expediting this Dmitry. I'm already dropping hints to my family for a trip out east to join in on this barn... I mean boat raising!

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    Replies
    1. ...Or a trip out west for me. There's plywood, epoxy, fiberglass and ShopBots to be found on both sides of the Continental Divide. Port Townsend, WA seems like a copacetic place from which to fill the Pacific Rim with QUIDNONs.

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  5. Super excited to hear that this will become reality very soon! Can't wait to follow along.

    I noticed that the pulpit and stanchions have changed since prior versions. This new iteration seems like a lot more windage. What's the reasoning?

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    Replies
    1. There were a few different realizations that went into making the decision in favor of bulwarks.
      • The stanchions and the rest of the welded stainless added up to quite a sum. Plywood and fiberglass are cheaper.
      • There wasn't any reasonable way of reinforcing the deck arches except to extend the sheer strips up.
      • It turned out that QUIDNON is a bit wet, and without bulwarks at the bow and the stern the deck would be awash more often than might seem pleasant.
      • It turned out that added windage doesn't do much for QUIDNON's surprising ability to sail to windward.
      • Need places to crouch in order to aim at pirates.
      • Deck boxes built into the bulwarks can provide storage for line, fenders, spare anchors, etc.

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  6. So, did the idea of using A-C grade plywood die? Was the potential savings not worth the risk? Or is only the first one going to be marine grade plywood?

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  7. The math for the ballast doesn't work. 1,380 gallons of freshwater would be 5.52 tons, but adding 3 tons of scrap steel would be over 8 tons, not 7 tons total ballast.

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  8. Dmitry, I'm curious if your design involves bent wood or bent wood laminate structural components? I'm imagining such as visible in the interior

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    1. We haven't figured it out whether we will need to steam-bend a few of the plywood pieces at the bow. We'll have to do some bending tests with 1/2" plywood, which is what we'll use, in two layers, for the sides and bottom. I did have to steam-bend some of the plywood for the 1:12 model, but that used 1/8 plywood, which translates to 1.5" at full-scale. There aren't any curved pieces except for the sides and the bottom (the transom is very slightly curved, just to make it a bit stiffer).

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  9. HULL TYPE: SCOW
    LOA: 11,28 m• LOD: 10,97 m • LWL: 10,67 m • BEAM: 4,87m
    STEERING: TWIN KICK-UP BOARDS & RUDDERS
    RIG TYPE: CHINESE JUNK • SAIL AREA: 92,9 m2
    DRAFT: BOARDS DOWN 2,13 m , BOARDS UP 0.46 m
    DISPLACEMENT: 12,2 TONS• GROSS TONNAGE: 25,4 TONS
    BALLAST: 7,1 TONS; WATER 5,08 TONS, STEEL SCRAP 3,048 TONS
    CONSTRUCTION: FIBERGLASS OVER MARINE PLYWOOD
    BUILD TYPE: MANUFACTURED KIT, RAPID DIY ASSEMBLY
    ENGINE: 29,3 Kw OUTBOARD IN INBOARD WELL
    CRUISING SPEED: 6 KNOTS (3,1 m/s) • MAX SPEED: 7.5 KNOTS (3,85m/s)
    WATER: 5220 litres • GASOLINE: 190 liters
    PROPANE: 2 9,1-kg CYLINDERS IN VENTED LOCKER
    ACCOMMODATIONS: SLEEPS 10 ADULTS, 5 WITH PRIVACY
    LAYOUT: 2 AFT CABINS, VESTIBULE, GALLEY, HEAD,
    SALON, 2 PILOT BERTHS, “U-BERTH” IN BOW

    Now I can rest.

    C'mon Dmitry, you're european.

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  10. Hi Dmitry,

    Well impressed with your progress thus far!

    Sent ye an email last week.. Looking forward to building a Quidnon (or two!) here in Ireland (Co. Offaly).

    In terms of the materials / items we could be sourcing and storing and WON'T get shipped with the 'Quidnon Kit' - what would they be?

    For instance - the Outboard motor (40 hp). Any particular make or features it should have, etc?

    Cheers,

    Michael.

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    Replies
    1. The minimal kit is just the plywood core, consisting of a set of panels, some of them finished, that are joined together using mortises and tenons and held together using wooden wedges. The rest of the parts—hardwood mast frames, aluminum and steel mast tabernacles and masts, deck surfacing, plumbing, wiring, illumination, electronics, equipment for the galley and the heads, etc.—can be either purchased or fabricated locally based on drawings. The epoxy and the fiberglass can be sourced from the local distributors (we will probably use System 3 epoxies in the US). For the engine, it is important that it be a high-thrust engine, designed to push a heavy load at slow speed rather than a light load at high speed, such as the Yamaha t50. This too can be sourced from a local distributor. Some additional pieces, such as diamond hatch deck cladding and copper bottom cladding, will be available as kit modifications.

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  11. Great; i'd say the purchase of a licence to use drawings is the way to go esp. for folk outside N. America..

    Our local Fab Lab (www.WeCreate.ie) has a large flatbed CNC milling machine & laser cutter for plexiglass / polycarbonate etc. There's also a bay there with a large roller shutter to house the boat :)

    I'll research high thrust engines, esp. 2nd hand. Also a System Three epoxy equivalent that;s sold in Europe.

    I wonder how much copper cladding the Quidnon needs - in terms of coverage and thickness?



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